Thursday, September 20, 2012

All That and a Bag of Chips



The title is one of my college roommate's favorite phrases for describing women he found attractive. He also liked to say, "I wouldn't kick her out of bed for eating crackers!" High praise indeed.

This week's Trifecta Writing Challenge got me thinking about my wife. Here are 333 words:

She is a powerhouse to the rest of the world, a force of nature, a focused and driven accomplisher of feats. She is that to me as well, but she gives to me more than she gives everyone else. To me alone she reveals parts of herself that she protects from the world. She walks in straight lines, and quickly, but I have come along on the slow meanderings, just us, alone. That is part of my love. I am elevated.

This, too, is part of my love, though I cannot make it sound the way it feels in my heart when I become lost in her: the inexpressible ache, the inexorable yearning to wrap her around me, to be thoroughly immersed in her as if she were the earth, the sea, the sky. I want to be so completely inside her that I disappear and she is everything. It is not destruction; it is transformation.

It’s a silly idea of course; I tower above her. I could wrap her up more thoroughly than she could me, at least by all appearances. She’s just a little thing, though certainly voluptuous. Upon meeting her for the first time, the word “ample” might rise to the minds of some, but both her body and her being are more than that. Such a small word, with suggestions of “enough” or even “a bit more than enough,” or “adequate,” “ample” is itself not adequate to describe her.

There are moments when her soft curves become the whole world.

When my son has come to me frustrated and baffled by the incomprehensible machinations of the neighborhood girls, I’ve told him that girls and women are special and magical and it is the role of boys and men to respect them, to honor them. He was dubious, but it’s a message I’ll repeat.  I could add “worship” to that list, too, but he’s not ready to hear that. He will learn it in his own time, if he’s lucky.

11 comments:

Jen said...

Yes. I love when I feel what a writer writes and this was it. By the end I was smiling and nodding my head. "Yes" I said out loud at the end, "Yes."

sandra tyler said...

hmm. like this. At 49 I would like to still think I might be "special" and "magical." good post.

Gina said...

Oh, I hope your wife has read this. It is a stunning expression of love and, yes, wonderful worship. I love what you've told your son and hope he gets to feel the depth of what you have when the time is right for him.

lumdog2012 said...

This is a lovely, heartfelt piece of writing. I would say the two of you are very lucky to have found each other. Nicely done.

Wisper said...

What an outstanding complement to your wife and an incredible testiment to your relationship. This was an amazing piece.

Paula J said...

What an incredible love letter.

Trifecta said...

Lovely. I can't imagine having a letter like that written about me. Your wife is lucky indeed. Sounds like you both are. Thanks for sharing.

I, Rodius said...

Thanks, y'all. Chicks dig "heartfelt."

Jester Queen said...

There's a scene right at the beginning of Gaiman's American Gods (and the trifextra challenge got me thinking about this in conjunction with what you say above) where a woman eats a man while they're having sex. He seems pretty happy about it.

Jester Queen said...

There's a scene right at the beginning of Gaiman's American Gods (and the trifextra challenge got me thinking about this in conjunction with what you say above) where a woman eats a man while they're having sex. He seems pretty happy about it.

I, Rodius said...

That's funny. I just read American Gods. I hadn't thought about it in this context, but I suppose it must've influenced me. That was one strange book.

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